Recurrent Training

Flight Review
Instrument Currency – Simulator
Instrument Proficiency Check
Flight Review

If you are a certificated pilot and looking for an effective flight review, we can help. Sun Coast Aviation suggests that you dedicate some time to reviewing FAA Regulations Part 61 and Part 91 and supplemental aeronautical information. For example, you may wish to review airspace classifications and operating requirements, day and night currency requirements, weather minimums, requirements for airworthiness, runway signage, fuel requirements, weight and balance calculations, performance planning, and risk management. Your Sun Coast Aviation CFI can assist you in locating appropriate course material to meet your specific flight review objectives.

FAA Regulation 61.56 defines:

(a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (f) of this section, a flight review consists of a minimum of 1 hour of flight training and 1 hour of ground training. The review must include:

(1) A review of the current general operating and flight rules of part 91 of this chapter; and

(2) A review of those maneuvers and procedures that, at the discretion of the person giving the review, are necessary for the pilot to demonstrate the safe exercise of the privileges of the pilot certificate.

(c) Except as provided in paragraphs (d), (e), and (g) of this section, no person may act as pilot in command of an aircraft unless, since the beginning of the 24th calendar month before the month in which that pilot acts as pilot in command, that person has -

(1) Accomplished a flight review given in an aircraft for which that pilot is rated by an authorized instructor and

(2) A logbook endorsed from an authorized instructor who gave the review certifying that the person has satisfactorily completed the review.

While a flight review is not a checkride, and, therefore cannot fail; however, your Sun Coast Aviation CFI must be satisfied that you can demonstrate the safe exercise of the privileges of your pilot certificate prior to endorsement.

Instrument Currency – Simulator

Maintaining instrument currency is an ongoing task that most instrument pilots struggle with more than a few times in their flying career – especially in fair weather states like Florida and California, this can be challenging. At Sun Coast Aviation, we offer a three-hour program spread out over a two-month period. These are arranged as two, 1 ½ hour sessions, one session per month with a Sun Coast Aviation CFII. The program consists of:

  • three hours of instrument experience
  • holding procedures
  • six instrument approaches
  • two unusual attitude recoveries while in a descending, Vne airspeed condition and two unusual attitude recoveries in an ascending stall speed condition
  • interception and course tracking with navigation systems

This is a great way to maintain currency and practice approaches into various airports such as those you be planning an actual flight.

Instrument Proficiency Check

If you are a certificated instrument pilot and looking for an effective Instrument Proficiency Check, we can help. Sun Coast Aviation suggests that you dedicate some time to reviewing FAA Regulations Part 61 and Part 91 with emphasis from Part 91.167 to 91.195 as well as supplemental aeronautical information including Advisory Circular 61-98. Your Sun Coast Aviation CFII can assist you in locating appropriate course material to meet your specific Instrument Proficiency Check objectives.

Sun Coast Aviation does provide options for conducting the Instrument Proficiency Check. Our Redbird SD simulator is FAA-Approved and most of the Instrument Proficiency Check can be conducted in the Redbird SD. A few maneuvers such as the circle to land requirement will be conducted in an airplane. If you prefer to conduct the entire Instrument Proficiency Check in an aircraft, we can also accommodate your needs.

FAA Regulation 61.57 defines:

(d) Instrument proficiency check. Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, a person who has failed to meet the instrument experience requirements of paragraph (c) for more than six calendar months may reestablish instrument currency only by completing an instrument proficiency check. The instrument proficiency check must consist of the areas of operation and instrument tasks required in the instrument rating practical test standards.

(1) The instrument proficiency check must be -

(i) In an aircraft that is appropriate to the aircraft category;

(ii) For other than a glider, in a flight simulator or flight training device that is representative of the aircraft category; or

(iii) For a glider, in a single-engine airplane or a glider.

(2) The instrument proficiency check must be given by -

(i) An examiner;

(ii) A person authorized by the U.S. Armed Forces to conduct instrument flight tests, provided the person being tested is a member of the U.S. Armed Forces;

(iii) A company check pilot who is authorized to conduct instrument flight tests under part 121, 125, or 135 of this chapter or subpart K of part 91 of this chapter, and provided that both the check pilot and the pilot being tested are employees of that operator or fractional ownership program manager, as applicable;

(iv) An authorized instructor; or

(v) A person approved by the Administrator to conduct instrument practical tests.

An IPC must be given in accordance with Instrument Rating ‒ Airplane, Airman Certification Standards, FAA-S-ACS-8, Task requirements are list in Appendix 5. While an Instrument Proficiency Check is not a checkride, it must be in compliance with the ACS and your Sun Coast Aviation CFII must ensure that you meet the standards set forth in FAA-S-ACS-8 and can competently and safely exercise of the privileges of your instrument rating prior to endorsement.